ES 214.2 - Extremism and Democracy in Europe - Atsungur G.

ES 214.2 - Extremism and Democracy in Europe - Atsungur G.

September 24, 2014

 

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ASIA

 

DEPARTMENT OF EUROPEAN STUDIES

 

Academic Year 2014-2015 Fall Semester

           

 

ES 214 Extremism and Democracy in Europe

Course ID: 3302/3303

  Course Schedule: Monday 10.00-10.50 (R230)& Wednesday 10.00-10.50 (R202/Library Building)

                            

Instructor: Assistant Professor Görkem Atsungur

Office: #214 – European Studies – (0312) 664571

Office Hours: Wednesday 11.00-12.00

E-mails: atsungur_g@auca.kg  

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

* Elective European Studies Departmental Course (Social Science Course)

Number of Credits: 2/4 cr.

 

Course Description:

   Some social phenomena cannot be defined as easily as it might seem at first sight. This is certainly the case with extremism and democracy. There are many factors that influence the definition itself such as political system, political culture, the system of values, ideologies, and many others. Extremism is essentially a political term which determines the activities that are not in accordance with norms of the state. As long as an extreme phenomenon is not defined legally, it is not possible to deal with it using coercive and other institutions of the national security system. European Societies have been fighting different kinds of religious, ideological, political, cultural, racial, or behavioral extremism for centuries. In order to avoid the misunderstanding of what extremism is and what it is not, and to make the fight against extremism legally possible, many actions found their way into national penal codes.

 

 Moreover, no political concept is more used, and at the same time misused, than that the concept of democracy in World politics. Almost every political regimes today claim to be ‘’democratic’’ but not all of them allow even the basic conditions of the democracy such as political freedom, free-fair elections and civil society. From Ancient Greece and Rome through the American, French and Russian revolutions till the modern time, the concept of democracy has always been discussed and will continue to be considered. For this reason, ‘’Democracy’’ is one of the cornerstones of the contemporary politics. Democratisation is a long term process and it is influenced by different various factors such as civil society, economic development and rule of law, etc. Many distinguished scholars such as Huntington, Schumpeter, Collier, Levitsky, Schedler, Rawls, O’Donnell, Lipset, Moore, Rustow, etc. have proposed different type of definitions of democracy. Certainly, the others can also suggest additional criteria for defining the political regime whether it is a democratic or not.

 

Course Objective:

   The objective of the course is to present theoretical and empirical framework of the concepts of ‘Extremism and Democracy’ in Europe. The course will analyse historical debates of non-democratic authoritarian regimes in Europe such as Hitler’s Germany, Mussolini’s Italy, Salazar’s Portugal, Franco’s Spain, Stalin’s Soviet Union, etc… Moreover, current debates on both right and left-wing of extremism in Europe will be covered. Left-wing extremism such as Generation 68, Action Directe, the Red Army Faction, Hippie communities, radical environmentalism and Right-wing extremism such as skinheads, neo-Nazi groups and rock bands, Religious Radicalism, Xenophobia, Social Movements and Protests and International Terrorism are the topics of the course. As a result of these, this course is divided in three basic sections focusing on different perspectives of extremism and democracy..

   At the end of the semester, students will familiarize with selected literature on “Extremism and Democracy” and also will develop competency in the area of critically discussing literary texts from a perspective on these concepts, through seminar discussion groups, discussing-leading and portfolio project.

  

 

II. COURSE RULES & POLICIES

 

A. Teaching Methods:

      The course objectives will be achieved through combination of lectures and seminars. Students will take active part in class discussions and read their weekly assignments/homework. Instructor uses audio-visual materials for the course chapters. All PowerPoint (ppt.) slides and readings are available in the e-course system.

 

B. Reading and Writing Materials:

   Instructors prepare all required materials for students. Necessary course materials, including the course Syllabus, can be found on the e-course website.

   The password for the e-course is esfall2014

   Students must check e-course materials regularly – at least twice a week before the classes.

   Each student has to read required readings which are indicated for each section before the class and students should come ready to present, argue and discuss them. Moreover, the students should submit all necessary essays and papers for the academic writing part. All reading materials, including term paper and other essays are the main responsibility of the student in order to pass this course.

 

C. Special Needs:

   Students with special needs may require special arrangements relating to attending class sessions, carrying out writing term project and essays or taking examinations. They are strongly encouraged to inform the Instructors during the first week of classes.

 

D. Classroom Rules of Conduct:

   Please respect university discipline rules and turn off cell phones and pagers during class. Students should keep quiet and not be late for the class. You cannot use social networks Facebook, VK, and Twitter etc. during the classes. If the professors notice such behaviour, s/he has right to ask these students to leave the classroom. Food and beverages are not permitted in the classroom. During the exams/quizzes, the use of cell phones, pagers, PDAs, or any other electronic devices is strictly prohibited. Unmoral/Rude behaviours to other students, staffs and/or the instructors will not be tolerated.

 

E. Academic Honesty and Discipline:

   Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated at AUCA. All assignments, essays, quizzes, and exams must be done by on your own. If the student is found engaged in cheating, plagiarism, inventing false information or citations, helping someone else or any other violation of the ‘’Code of Academic Integrity,’’ s/he should expect the severest penalties available under AUCA policies. According to Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Plagiarize means: “to steal and pass of (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own, to use (another’s production) without crediting the source, to commit literary theft and to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.” As a result of these, Plagiarism is an act of fraud. 

   Students found guilty of academic dishonesty will be assigned an appropriate academic penalty. 

   For more information, please visit: http://www.auca.kg/en/registrar_code_conduct/

   Academic writing component of the course will help you to show how to write an academic article. Moreover, feel free to consult the instructors at any time and/or during the office hours.

 

F. Adobe Connect:

   Since Fall 2014, the instructor Atsungur has been selected by the Office of the CIO to use ‘Adobe Connect’ program in his courses. Adobe Connect is a web conferencing platform for Web Meetings, eLearning, and webinars. For instance, when the instructor is abroad for conference and academic purposes, he can record his courses and students can reach his classes through the links. Moreover, the instructor will record his courses during his classes. Digital meetings enable live, interactive, effective classes and group collaboration between the instructor and students anytime, anywhere, on virtually any device. Students are expected to follow adobe connect requirements.

 

III. COURSE ASSESSMENT & REQUIREMENTS

 

A. Participation and Class Discussions – 10%

   The nature of the subject requires active class participation therefore the students will not be receiving credits based purely on class attendance for participation and class discussions. All students should NOT hesitate to participate when they want to expand the topic or they need further explanation, etc. Participation is required for both content and writing part of the course.

   Moreover, during the semester students are required to engage in online participation through the e-course system. As a result of this, it is highly recommended to check the e-course at least twice each week.

   Any student who misses more than four classes unexcused of the course without medical report to confirm illness, s/he will fail the course. Students must bring their medical certificate within one week. After one week, medical certificates will not be accepted. All medical certificates must be approved by AUCA clinic first. Without AUCA stamp, medical certificates will not be valid.

   Active and meaningful participation will add 10% to the final grade. Medical certification will only help not to fail the grade. Please do not forget that the instructors will also give some points to class attendance.

   Moreover, in the fall semester in November, there will be a simulation game. All students should attend this game. Simulation game is not extra-curriculum activity. It is part of the academic course. The topic of the stimulate game will be decided with students in the beginning of the semester.

 

B.  Portfolio - 70%

- (1) Glossary of Terms: 10%

   The glossary provides the reader with definitions of (un)familiar terms used in the course. Type the term to be defined in bold text and provide a definition for your term. Try to express this term  in a single sentence with simple words. Direct the reader to other related glossary entries, if necessary. The Glossary should not be plagiarized or copy-paste from other sources. It should consist at least 30 terms which are commonly used in the course content.

- (2) Writing a Film Analysis: 10%

   Students should choose one film such as ‘La vita è bella (Life is Beautiful), Schindler's List, Two Lives, The Great Dictator, The Sound of Music, Europa Europa, The Pianist, The Counterfeiters, The Reader, etc…, which is related with the course topic (Extremism and Democracy in Europe). To write an analysis of a film, you must study the film carefully. You should study the film by watching it multiple times on a DVD or websites such as YouTube, etc. Take notes during the first viewing.Your critical analysis should be derived from your personal encounter with the film, not from published criticism. Use your analysis of the individual film elements as the body of your paper; then add an introductory paragraph, and a conclusion to shape the paper into a complete essay. Critically engage the movie so that you can effectively produce a strong essay. Focus on a single thematic concept related to the film.

   When examining the film, ask yourself the following questions: What is the director's purpose or primary aim in making the film? Introduce the film and its major participants, such as the actors and director. Write a short (one paragraph) Synopsis about the film.

   The film analysis should be between two-three (1.000-1.500 words) typewritten pages, one and half-spaced.

   In order to have more information about film analysis, you can access the example in the link:

http://www.westga.edu/~scarter/From_notes_to_filmessay.htm

- (3) Writing Reflection of a Book: 10%

   Students will read one book relating with the course such as ‘’Lenin - What is to be done’’, ‘’Mussolini – The Doctrine of Fascism’’, ‘’Hitler – Mein Kampf’’, etc... Write down your thoughts about the book. Do not summarize the plot. Instead, think about one or two episodes and what they made you think of. Did they remind you of other books? Could you relate to what the character went through? What was the author trying to express, and do you think he did a good job expressing it? Specifically address the issues in the book, but also make it a personal essay.

   Write the introduction. Your introduction should make the connection between the book and your own life. You can start with either as long as you show how they are related, leading into the body of your essay.

   Reflections are not supposed to summarize the book but rather use it as a jumping-off point to examine deeper issues of life, society and human nature. Your essay should show that you understand the book but also that you can think creatively and relate it to your own life.

   Write a conclusion. In a reflective essay, and the conclusion should create a feeling of poignancy. You want to relate what you're talking about to your reader. You are telling a story, and you have already gotten the reader's attention at this point. Give him a satisfying ending that relates back to the book, and perhaps to his own experiences.

   The reflection of the book should be between two-three (1.000-1.500 words) typewritten pages, one and half-spaced.

 - (4) Quotes and Slogans: 10%

   Students will find ten different quotes and/or slogans relating with the course topics and they will write down their own opinion relating with these sentences. For instance, students can choose ‘dictatorship quotes’ from Plato, Charles Bukowski, Viktor Hugo, George Orwell, etc.

 

 

- (5) Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) of Mass Media: 10%

   Each Student will choose one European country and follow this country online newspaper in English and follow the news relating with extremism and democracy issues in that country and write one essay (two/three pages, 1000-1500 words) contains analysis of the use of hidden meaning in mass media.

- (6) Watching and Reporting a Speech: 10%

   Each Student will watch and/or read one of the speech relating with the extremism and democracy and then write one-two pages (500-1000 words) essay relating with that speech. Please click on the link below for more information on how to write a reporting speech and one good example.

http://msfreemansclasses.weebly.com/uploads/5/6/4/5/5645465/political_speech_analysis.pdf

http://sixminutes.dlugan.com/speech-analysis-winston-churchill-iron-curtain/

- (7) Reading a Song, Cartoons and Advertisement: 10%

   Students will analyse one song or cartoons or any advertisement relating with extremism and democracy in Europe. They will write one page (500 words) reflection to it.

 

C. Final Exam – 20%

   Each student must take a final exam (20%) for this course. The final exam will be given after the entire course is completed. Starting from Fall-2014 the Registrar office is responsible for scheduling of final exams. The date of final exam will be announced later.

   There will be six essay questions in the exams and students will answer only four of them.

   The Final exam will last 50 minutes. 

   Make-up examinations will NOT be administered except in the case of a medical emergency. If students try to attempt cheating during the exam, the instructor will give F grade for final grade, and a student will fail in the course.

 

Grading Policy:

  The grade for the course will be comprised of the following percentages:

Participation and Class Discussions: 10%

Portfolio: 70%

Final Exam: 20%

 

 

Grade

Quality Points

Results

Grade Percentages

          A

4.00

Excellent

Above 93%

          A-

3.67

Excellent

89.51% - 92.49%

          B+

3.33

Good

85.51% - 89.49%

          B

3.0

Good

82.51% - 85.49%

          B-

2.67

Good

79.51% - 82.49%

          C+

2.33

Average

75.51% - 79.49%

          C

2.0

Average

72.51% - 75.49%

          C-

1.67

Average

69.51% - 72.49%

          D+

1.33

Poor

65.51% - 69.49%

        D

1.0

Poor

62.51% - 65.49%

        D-

0.67

Poor

59.51% - 62.51%

        F

0.00

Failed

Less than 59.49 %

      AU

 

 

Course Audit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Note: These grades are used for all courses of European Studies Department at AUCA.

 

Excellent Grades: ‘’A’’ and ‘’A-‘’.                       Good Grades: ‘’B+’’, ‘’B’’, and ‘’B-‘’.

Average Grades: ‘’C+’’, ‘’C’’, and ‘’C-‘’.            Poor Grades: ‘’D+’’, ‘’D’’, and ‘’D-‘’.

Failed Grade: ‘’F’’.

 

Grading Criteria for Written Assignments:

 

[A]

 

Outstanding: a paper has distinctive ideas, perfectly organized, and is of exceptional quality; a thorough and thoughtful treatment of the topic presented in a logical and convincing manner; the paper has a clearly articulated thesis; the ideas are original and complex; sources are used carefully and appropriately to support the original argument; careful attention is paid to language and to details of expression and presentation.

[A-]

Excellent: a paper has mostly excellent ideas and content is organized suitably; the paper is well-structured, with clear themes supported by evidence; the ideas are original and complex; sources are used carefully and appropriately; careful attention is paid to language and to details of expression and presentation. Occasional lapses in expressions, in the development of ideas, or in the handling of evidences / or sources.

[B+]

Very Good: a paper is thorough and thoughtful but lacks originality, comprehensiveness or insight; effective and appropriate structure; mostly relevant evidence is used to support the main argument; the writing style is less fluid or sophisticated than the ‘A’ papers; attention is paid  to language and to details of expression and presentation but with only a few lapses.

[B]

 

Generally Very Good: a paper is well-reasoned and well-organized but with little originality; effective and appropriate structure; mostly relevant evidence is used to support the main argument; ideas are well developed and can be easily followed but occasional errors may distract from the content; the writing style is less fluid or sophisticated than the ‘A’ papers; attention is paid to language and to details of expression and presentation but with only a few lapses.

[B-]

Good: a paper is well-reasoned and well-organized but with little originality; clear and appropriate structure; mostly relevant evidence is used to support the main argument but difficulties with incorporation of the sources into the line of the argument is evident; ideas are well developed and can be easily followed but occasional errors may distract from the content; attention is paid to language and to details of expression and presentation but with some lapses.

[C+]

 

Average: a paper is well-reasoned and well-organized, and shows competency on the subject matter; adequate structure, but there are problems or limitations in logic, argumentation, insights, or organization; the main argument shows good critical skills and originality of thought, but that struggles with problems of expression and presentation. Overall, ideas need to be developed in proper depth but can be followed.

[C]

Satisfactory: a paper is well-reasoned and well-organized, and shows competency on the subject matter; adequate structure, but there are significant problems or limitations in logic, argumentation, insights, or organization; errors in expression and presentation distract from the development of content. Overall, ideas can usually be followed but need further exploration and deeper development.

[C-]

Satisfactory: a paper is well-developed but lacks coherence: either because of distracting lapses in language that make ideas difficult to understand or lack of connections and transitions between ideas; Support from sources is weak and not developed enough; nevertheless, this paper meets basic requirements.

[D+]

 

Poor: a paper shows a serious attempt but with limited success; there is not clear focus or thesis holding the paper together; evidence is scanty and not clearly linked to the main argument; the handling of evidence raises some concerns; attention to language and presentation is wavering and uncertain; errors in grammar, punctuation; or spelling distract from the content, but these appear in only a minority of the sentences.

[D]

Poor: a paper shows an attempt but with limited success; there is not clear focus or thesis holding the paper together; evidence is scanty and not clearly linked to the main argument; the handling of evidence raises serious concerns, as the evidence is too unsubstantial or too unrelated to the main idea; attention to language and presentation is erratic and uncertain; errors in grammar, punctuation; or spelling distract from the content, but these appear in only a minority of the sentences.

 

[D-]

Very poor: a paper neither demonstrates understanding of the material nor articulates any coherent argument about it; the paper might wander among several ideas without developing any single one; there is no thesis; the paper is relied on quotations rather than developing original ideas; attention to language and presentation is erratic and uncertain; errors in grammar, punctuation; or spelling distract from the content.

[F]

 

Fail: a paper fails to address the assignment in fundamental ways and reveals serious writing problems of the author.

The paper is plagiarized from other sources.

 

 

V. TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

 

Week I. Introduction

01.09.2014 – No Classes (Independence Day of the Kyrgyz Republic)

03.09.2014Introduction

 

A. Theoretical Framework: Conceptualize Extremism and Democracy

 

Week II. Conceptualize Extremism and Democracy

08.09.2014 & 10.09.2014 – What Extremism and Democracy is… and Is Not.  

 

Week III. Elements of Extremism and Democracy

15.09.2014 & 17.09.2014 - What are the elements of Extremism and Democracy?

 

B. Historical Background: Extremism vs. Democracy in Europe

 

Week IV. Nazism in Europe

22.09.2014 -Nazi Germany: Hitler – Mein Kampf

24.09.2014 – Never Again: Holocaust – ‘Die Jugenfrage: Arbeit Macht Frei‘

Week V. Dictatorships and Fascism in Europe

29.09.2014 – Dictators in Europe: Franco in Spain, Salazar in Portugal, and Seven Years in Greece.

01.10.2014 - Fascist Italy: ‘Democracy is beautiful in theory; in practice it is a fallacy by Mussolini’.

 

Week VI. Socialism vs. Communism in Europe

06.10.2014 - Workers of the World: Unite - The Communist Dictatorships of Lenin and Stalin

08.10.2014 – Glasnost and Perestroika: Collapse or Disintegration?

 

Week VII. Democracy’s Third Wave Today in Europe

13.10.2014 - Transition to Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe: A Success or Failure?

15.10.2014 - Transition to Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe: A Success or Failure?

 

C. Empirical Studies of ‘Extremism and Democracy’: Contention as Politics

 

Week VIII. Left-Wing Extremism in Europe I

20.10.2014 - Counterculture of the 1960s: Action Directe (AD) in France and The Red Army Faction (RAF) in Germany.

22.10.2014 - The Generation of 68: Students for Liberty – Revolution in the World System 

 

Week IX.  Left-Wing Extremism in Europe II

27.10.2014 - New Age Communities: Hippie Havens: Christiania (DK) and Ibiza (ES).

29.10.2014 - Eco Anarchism – Radical Environmentalism: Earth First! -  Earth Liberation Front (ELF)

 

Week X. Right-Wing Extremism in Europe I

03.11.2014 – Right-Wing Extremism in Europe

05.11.2014 – Skinheads, Neonazis and Rock Bands

 

 

Week XI. Religious Extremism in Europe: Clash of Civilizations?

10.11.2014 & 12.11.2014 – Religious Extremism in Europe

 

Week XII. In the Wake of Xenophobia: The New Racism in Europe

17.11.2014 & 19.11.2014 – Xenophobia in Europe

 

Week XIII. Revolting Europe: Social Movements and Protests

24.11.2014 & 26.11.2014 – Let’s Occupy Europe!

 

Week XIV. International Terrorism: Europe in the Aftermath of 11 September

01.12.2014 & 03.12.2014 – International Terrorism and Europe

 

Week XV. Review of the Course: Challenge of Extremism and Populism

08.12.2014 & 10.12.2014 – Review of the Course: What could be done in order to prevent Extremism and consolidate democracy?  

 

*All reading materials will be available each week in the E-course system. Please check each week for readings.

https://e-course.auca.kg/course/view.php?id=1346

 

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